Lotte Martens Blog Tour

When the opportunity to get to work with some luscious and otherwise rather elusive fabrics presented itself, I had to pinch myself. Is this real? Lotte Martens wanted me to participate in a blog tour for their textiles and they would send me the materials. It seemed too good to be true. Well, of course, you're reading this because I accepted that offer and now I can finally share a couple of incredible projects.

If you're in the US like me, you may not have heard of Lotte Martens. It's a small Belgium-based design and textile printing operation with a heart of gold. Their site explains, "No pre-bought prints, no child labour in foreign countries: every step in the production process, from the first design to the final touch, is completed with the greatest care... Because our fabrics are printed by hand, they are all slightly different and thus unique." More about Lotte and the team here. And If you're lucky enough to live in or visit Europe, you can find Lotte Martens in these stores

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With that introduction and background out of the way, I can start gushing about the fabric. I knew immediately that I wanted to work with the Cypris. The full panel I received is shown below. It's a poly/viscose twill in a nice medium blue hue. Do you see that band of copper flecks? I mean you can't miss it, but please note it speaks right to my soul. I had to hang it up and share it on IG right away, so apologies for the indoor pic. #sorrynotsorry

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And I used essentially every bit of it. I'm serious when I say I've never been so careful about my cutting layout. Usually I throw most of what little caution I have to the wind. But handling such luxurious fabric calls for quite a bit more prudence.

Only this little scrap of selvage was left when I was done cutting.

Only this little scrap of selvage was left when I was done cutting.

The Cypris became a zippered, fold-over tote (Senna Tote by LBG Studio), with navy cork for the bottom and handles. This bag was a first for me on a couple accounts- first time sewing this specific bag pattern and my first time working with cork. Fabulous experience all around! 

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The bag has an interlining of canvas which gives it just enough body to stand on its own.

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I had just enough Cypris to make a matching zippered pouch, (The Double Zip Pouch by LBG Studio). I participated in testing for this pattern. More in a previous post, here.

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It's a stunning set, if I don't say so myself. 

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Stop for a moment and draw your attention from the fabric and focus on the hardware. Truth be told, I was going to use an antique gold zipper I had in my stash for this bag. Well, my sewing buddy and google wiz friend, Gwyn wouldn't have it. She found the perfect copper zipper and coordinating hardware on the Sallie Tomato site. She's clever, that gal, and she was so right to nag me about getting the right hardware.

Even the magnetic snaps are copper to complement the Cypris!

Even the magnetic snaps are copper to complement the Cypris!

Ok. Let's get back to drooling over the fabric.

Back with large pocket

Back with large pocket

I also received 1 meter of Grus crepe. I used the Coram Top pattern here. While Coram is designed to be sewn with all woven material, I didn't quite have enough of the Grus for that. Instead of resigning to use a different pattern, I found something in my stash to coordinate with the Grus. This Art Gallery knit became the sleeves and neckband. The gold in it matches the gold in the pale mint Grus so incredibly well, don't you think? 

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The Grus was fabulous for this style, a better choice than the lawn I used for my muslin. It drapes rather nicely and has an airy quality about it. (Just watch that side slit on this pattern! I'm wearing a tank folded up to the top of my mid-rise jeans for reference as to where the slit starts on my 5'5" frame. Since I typically wear tanks under my tops, I don't mind the slit as is. Alternatively, one could lower the vent or wear high-waisted bottoms.)

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After working with these fabrics, I can't stop dreaming about getting more to work with. I'm hoping as Lotte Martens expands we'll get a fabric shop (read: enabler) in the US to carry these unique and stunning textiles.

So, thanks for stopping by! I love it when my readers leave comments or ask questions, so please do so if you feel inclined. Just head back up to the top of the post so your remarks get added to this post and not the one below. It's backwards, I know!

I'm just gonna leave a few other swatches here. #sorrynotsorry

Buteo

Buteo

Corax Jersey

Corax Jersey

Niyona Print

Niyona Print


Thanks again, Lotte Martens, for inviting me to participate in your intenational tour.

Studio Tour

I spruced the place up so you could have a peek inside. I guarantee it will never look this good again, because making is mayhem. Anyone who does any kind of crafting can attest to that.

Sew anyway! 

Before

Before

We moved into this home about 6 months ago. I quickly claimed the mostly finished attic as my sewing space. The floor was in pretty awful shape and the color of granny panties. (You know the color.) Picking paint colors is a somewhat painful process for me. But I already had one of those lovely rolling craft carts from that Swedish furniture place in a light shade of teal. Boom. Decision made and the floor was painted craft cart blue.

MUCH BETTER!

MUCH BETTER!

Those open shelves were already there and are perfect for supplies. I added 2 of those simple desks (one for the sewing machine and one for the serger) with open shelves for some storage opportunities, but my gosh! I have no drawers to speak of. Love the barn wood! 

Cutting zone

Cutting zone

Opposite the sewing side is the cutting side. (We're sort of moving backwards, process-wise, but oh well!) If you could look out the window, you'd see the tiny little town of Marrieta right at the confluence of the Muskingum River with the Ohio. My cutting table is actually our old dining table, so it's a bit low for the back, but nice and long. Perfect for clutter which has been removed for your viewing pleasure.

Here's a few more scenes. It's a all coming together. I just need some more wire baskets for stashing things so I'll forget about them and buy more things.

There's actually a whole other division to the attic space. It's mostly a place to store our off-season clothing (old house = tiny closets), but it's also where mom's machine hangs out.

There's the ironing zone (not pictured) which is entirely un-glamorous. Who wants to see my scorched ironing board cover anyway? Is it even possible to have one that doesn't end up looking like toast?

What you also haven't seen yet is my fabric stash. I have literal bucket loads. Fabric lust and hoarding is a serious thing, y'all. The sewers know what I'm talking about and the rest of you might keel over if I showed you.

I think that's about it. Leave me a comment if you swung by for the tour. I'd love to know if you had any thoughts or suggestions. Thanks!